The Raphael Research Resource began to examine how complex conservation, scientific and art historical research could be combined in a flexible digital form. Exploring the presentation of interrelated high resolution images and text, along with how the data could be stored in relation to an event driven ontology in the form of RDF triples. In addition to the main user interface the data stored within the system is now also accessible in the the form of open linkable data combined with a SPARQL end-point at http://rdf.ng-london.org.uk/raphael.

This workshop will introduce and discuss the information which is and is not currently available within this resource and some of the web-base tools that have been developed to disseminate it. Some examples will also be provided in relation to the National Gallery Collection as a whole and a few other related projects. The workshop will then move on to examine how this type of linkable data can be re-used to create new presentations.

This process will be based on but not necessarily limited too:
  • How to perform basic SPARQL queries.
  • Using PHP to collect and format the results of basic SPARQL queries.
  • Using existing IIPImage javascript libraries to present high resolution images.
  • Using PHP and HTML to combine the formatted results and images into simple web-pages.
This work-shop is intended as a basic introduction to these particular resources and some of the techniques currently being used to exploit them. The resources will remain publicly available after the workshop for those who wish to continue to work with them. An archive of the code used to create this workshop presentation can be downloaded here.

Sorry the following SPARQL End-point is not currently available

http://rdf.ng-london.org.uk/raphael/sparql/

This end-point may be down for testing/administration purposes or a problem may have occured. Please contact Joseph Padfield, The National Gallery Scientific Department, for further information or to report this issue.


This site was developed by: Joseph Padfield, The National Gallery Scientific Department.